Tag Archives: Flourishing Faith

22 Ways to Be (a Little More) Present

Be present.

What can this actually look like? How can we be more present to God (who is always, ever present with us)? How can we, in general, be present to our lives—to our experiences, to our loved ones, to our work and our world?

Here’s a list of 22 ideas, but a big, giant caveat on such lists: No one person can do all of these things at once! And I’m not suggesting that you do – because I certainly don’t (and can’t). Peruse a list like this with your soul listening to the Holy Spirit. What one thing might you want to focus on? Or what new idea springs to your mind as you consider this? Go with it.

paints Live a little more.

• Make it a goal to laugh more today! Laugh and smile with someone you love.

• Pause from busyness to enjoy beauty: nature, music, art, ideas. Just 5 minutes can transform your mindset for the rest of the day.

• Immerse yourself in a creative endeavor: Cook a meal with gusto, write a letter to a friend (on actual paper), scrawl out a drawing, sing your heart out in the shower.

• Enjoy your work. Value the tasks or employment God has put on your plate today, be it housework, office work, or whatever. Find meaning it in – sacredness – and find joy in utilizing your skills and efforts to get a job well done.

• Move a little more. Get that heart pumping. Use that body God has given you. Exercise (and try to enjoy it).

• Pause to be grateful for your life. Say thank you. Say it again. And again.

Love a little more. Continue reading

2 Strange, Miraculous Gifts

Our guilt and pain . . . can even become avenues of life and light and love.

That’s the statement with which I ended last week’s post. So how can guilt, pain, flaws, and brokeness lead to something good? Something beautiful?

true storyI believe there are 2 strange and miraculous gifts we are given in and through our experiences of guilt, sin, pain, and failure. The first is the gift of conviction, and the second is the gift of a grace-story. And of course, we are given these gifts in and through the grace of Christ and his redeeming work on the Cross.

Read these 2 excerpts from my new Bible study Surrender Your Guilt and consider how God might be prompting you to receive and to respond to these gifts. (Excerpts are ©Kelli B. Trujillo, published by Wesleyan Publishing House, used with permission)

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Conviction vs. Condemnation

Jesus’ interaction with the woman caught in adultery (John 8) provides us with a powerful snapshot of the difference between conviction and condemnation. Did her sins deserve condemnation? Absolutely—and Jesus’ gracious actions toward her in no way “excused” the sin of adultery. But Jesus did not condemn her—the person she was. Instead, he spoke convicting truth into her life: “Go now and leave your life of sin” (8:11). Jesus directly acknowledged the sin and told her to leave it behind. Rather than the hopeless, dreary, ever-worsening, and (for this woman) even deadly future of condemnation, conviction offered her hope, clearly envisioning for her a new way of being. God’s gift of conviction helps us see that we can be set free and start anew! Continue reading

On Fissures and Faith, Cracks and the Cross

I shared last week about the importance of letting go of guilt—and embracing grace.

dry cracksNow some of you may have read that post and muttered under your breath, that’s easier said than done. Because we don’t have a magic-miraculous-memory-marker that can scribble out the mistakes we’ve made as if they never happened—even though we’re forgiven, we may still remember them. And also there are times when we know we should feel guilty—when we’re deeply (and healthily) aware of our shortcomings, flaws, propensity to hurt others, self-centeredness . . . our sin.

And so we must see that “letting go” is part of the conversation rather than the final statement on guilt and grace.

Another critical aspect of experiencing grace—of really living in its power—is courageously seeing our flaws and failings, acknowledging them, and even (strangely) treasuring them.

Wait, what? Was that a typo?

Nope.

Because here’s what I’ve been learning from some amazing, spiritual writers. In What’s So Amazing About Grace?, Philip Yancey discusses what happens “when I begin to see myself as a sinner who cannot please God by any method of self-improvement or self-enlargement. Only then can I turn to God for outside help—for grace—and to my amazement I learn that a holy God already loves me deeply despite my defects. . . . Our wounds and defects are the very fissures through which grace might pass.”

And Max Lucado evokes a similar imagery: “Grace. Let it, let him, so seep into the crusty cracks of your life that everything softens. Then let it, let him, bubble to the surface, like a spring in the Sahara, in words of kindness and deeds of generosity.”

Fissures. Cracks. Fractures, chinks, rifts, and wrinkles. The lines that mark our living. The painful memories. The dogged habits. The heavy regrets. The spur-of-the-moment ugliness.

Our guilt and pain, our failures and flaws, are the means through which we experience the grace of Christ. They show us our need. They bring us to the Cross in penitence or desperation.

And they can even become avenues of life and light and love. 

On Guilt, Grace, and Letting Go

This month journey with me through the theme “Surrender Your Guilt.”

stones handSo often we go through life holding on to guilt, burdened by secrets, harboring hidden pain, or listening to the scolding voices of self-condemnation. We let false messages about ourself, our worth, our failures, and our inadequacies dog us through life. We carry around lies, sins, failures, weaknesses, and all kinds of assorted junk.

And we need to let go.

In honor of my new book by the same title, we’ll explore how God’s grace enables us to do just that. Grace is so much more that we often see; it’s deeper, more expansive, challenging, life-giving, compelling, absolute and complete . . .

My list could go on and on! But to start things out, let’s focus on 5 amazing truths about grace that have been heartening me, changing me, healing me, inspiring me, and calling me.

1. Grace forgives us.

2. Grace convicts us.

3. Grace costs us.

4. Grace empowers us.

5. Grace sustains us.

I wrote an article exploring these 5 critical ideas in depth — it’s FREE on Today’s Christian Woman.com.

Here’s the start of the article, “Freedom in Forgiveness.”

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If you would have asked me two decades ago as a Christian teenager about God’s grace, I could have easily explained it. I might have told you about the acronym “God’s Riches At Christ’s Expense” or maybe I would’ve explained the idea of “unmerited favor.” I may have outlined some of the theological squabbles about grace and salvation among various Christian traditions. And I definitely would have quoted Ephesians 2:8–9 to make sure you understood that it’s free.

But now, decades later with some life under my belt? I’d tell you today that grace is bigger, deeper, and more expansive than a simplified acronym or a theological transaction. It’s like that saying, “The more you know, the more you realize all you have to learn.” I’m discovering that grace is much more and does much more than I was able to understand in my youth. And I’m certain that decades into the future—when I’ve walked through more joys and heartaches and hopes and fears—my experience of grace will be even richer.

The God of Grace

So what is grace? In Scripture, “grace” draws together several key biblical concepts. In the Old Testament, it’s the “favor” God shows (hen in Hebrew); it’s being merciful and compassionate (hanan); it’s steadfast love (hesed). In the New Testament, the Greek word charis builds upon these concepts to communicate the favor of God understood, particularly, through the lens of the forgiveness and redemption we find in Jesus’ death and resurrection.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE ON TODAY’S CHRISTIAN WOMAN.

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Join me in conversation this entire month as we explore how to live guilt-surrendered, grace-enriched lives!

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The Hard Work of Worship — Sharon Hodde Miller

As we wrap up January’s theme “Awaken Your Soul,” I’m excited to invite you into a conversation with Sharon Hodde Miller. Sharon is a regular contributor to Christianity Today’s Her.meneutics blog and has written for a variety of other resources including Relevant and Today’s Christian Woman. Her blog, She Worships, zeroes in on a critical theme we’ve been looking at this month: worship.

Welcome, Sharon! Tell my readers a bit about yourself.

DSC_0886(1) copyHello everyone, and thanks Kelli for inviting me to be here!

I guess I’ll share a few highlights. I am a southern gal. My husband and I are both from North Carolina, but we moved to the Chicago area about 3 years ago for school. Now we’re both working on our PhD’s and raising our 17 month-old son, which means that our lives are a lot of fun and also totally insane.

In between all that, I write.

Your blog has the theme “She Worships.” Why did you pick that focus? What does it mean to you?

I started my blog about 7 years ago. At the time I was teaching and discipling college women, and I wanted another avenue to reach and encourage them. That’s how I began blogging, and eventually it morphed into a larger ministry to women (although a lot of men read my blog too!).

As for the title, I picked “She Worships” because it’s what we were all created for. If you could boil our existence down to one thing, that is it. Romans 12:1 tells us that worship is not confined to the walls of a church, but is instead a lifestyle. Everything we do, from Sunday morning hymns to marriage, to parenting, to going to the grocery store, to cleaning the toilet — it can all be an expression of worship.

I have tried to write my blog with that broader theology in view. I cover a lot of topics, but all with an eye to worshiping and glorifying Christ. 

What has God been teaching you lately about worship?

Lately God has been teaching me just how hard it is. Not hard in the sense that it’s grueling, but in the sense that it is not the natural inclination of my flesh.

Actually, when I think about it, my flesh IS inclined to worship, but it is not inclined to worship God. Instead, I find myself constantly tempted toward lesser, false gods.

I have found that if I don’t keep the gospel directly before me, I will chase after other things: the approval of others, my own fame, a comfortable life, etc. Continue reading

10 Little Ways to Wake Up

Pray more. Worship more. Read Scripture more. Yeah . . . you got those. These are often the spiritual “prescription” we receive when we know our spirit needs a boost. And these are right on. These are essential vitamins we need for our souls’  well-being! But in addition to these basics, God invites us into something other than just “do more” . . . than just a to-do list that always says you aren’t doing enough. Here are 10 little ways you can wake up your soul . . . peruse, pick 1 or 2, let your mind wander to pick your own.R U Awake

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1. Take 5 minutes to list (or speak aloud) things you’re grateful for. Praise God for them all!

2. Hug or kiss someone you really love. Consider how this human relationship provides a glimpse into intimacy with God.

 3. Hunt for nature’s beauties. God is the very essence of beauty! (Too cold outside? Look out your window with a mission to notice beauties you often over look. Or peruse online nature images instead.)

 4. Laugh out loud. Dwell in some delightful or silly memories or watch a funny movie. God is the ultimate source of joy . . . our own chuckles remind us of a deeper joy we experience in God.

 5.  Continue reading

Flourish . . . in Worship

“Awake, my soul! . . . I will awaken the dawn.” (Psalm 57:8)

AwakenYourSoul-CVR1As we explore worship and prayer this month, I’m excited to share with you an excerpt about worship from my brand new Flourishing Faith book, Awaken Your Soul.

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What do you love about God? What leaves you in silent, wonder-filled awe? What is it about God that stirs up gratitude joy, delight, and devotion in your soul?

As we grow closer in intimacy with God, the character of God absolutely compels us to respond. And that response? It’s worship.

In English, worship comes from Old English weorthscipe1It simply means worth-ship. In this sense, worship is declaring God’s worth; it’s focusing on, delighting in, and living by the truly awe-some reality of who God is.

There are many biblical words that mean “worship;” one is is proskuneo which means to kiss toward, to bow down with forehead to the ground, to prostrate oneself, to give homage.2 It describes a physical act of profound reverence. The “kiss” isn’t a kiss of romance—it’s the “kiss” of face to floor, kneeling or laying flat in a posture of utter reverence.

Practicing the discipline of worship is a way we blink and rub the bleariness from our spiritual vision and, in sharp clarity, see the world as it really is. Continue reading

Freedom: Expanding Prayer

Prayer, I think, is right up there on my list as one of the most difficult spiritual disciplines. I’ve always struggled with it. I’m such a do-er that the be-ing aspect of prayer (stillness, quietness, waiting) has always been a struggle for me.

birds flying peachBut I’ve also found it easier and easier over the last few years. Not because my personality has changed or I’ve somehow just gotten better at it. Instead, it’s because my understanding of what prayer is has grown, changed, and expanded. I’ve begun to learn, a bit more each day, that prayer is a lot more expansive than the narrow, this-doesn’t-fit-me-well, version of it I’ve so often struggled with. Continue reading

Awaken Your Soul

Faith is more than mental assent to a set of beliefs—it’s a relationship.

OK . . . you know this lingo, right? But here’s my question—to you and to me—do we truly experience it?

dandelionGod uniquely crafted us to long for intimacy with others; so what can that intimacy look like with the Creator himself?

How can it be deeper, more connected, more real? Rather than words or a set of beliefs and ideas or lingo we banter about with other Christians . . . how can this be something we each profoundly experience? Experience more . . . deeper . . .  personally . . . Continue reading

Do: Shine!

“. . . in which you shine . . . like stars in the sky” (Philippians 2:15).

“You are the light of the world” (Matthew 5:14).

star nightMy new Flourishing Faith Bible study Shine Your Light explores service, compassion, justice, action . . . the doing side of our faith. Take time to journey through this excerpt as we wrap up our discussion on doing.

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 “I will show you my faith by what I do” (James 2:18b). Faith—believing in the good news—is intricately interconnected with action. Just as faith demonstrates itself in works, works proclaim our faith to the world. Our actions, demeanor, words, character, and way of life declare a message!

. . .  One powerful theme interwoven throughout the book of James is that what we believe ought to show itself in what we do and how we act:

• We’re to truly listen to God’s Word and respond by doing what it says (1:22-25)

• As believers in our compassionate, just, and merciful God, we’re to live the good news by caring for the poor, vulnerable, and overlooked (1:27; 2:1-13).

• Living the gospel means loving our neighbors as ourselves—and that includes seemingly “unimportant” people (2:1-13).

• Belief in the gospel demonstrates itself in our actions (2:14-26).

• Our actions and demeanor reveal that we are aligned with a new way of thinking as we live by values “from above” (3:13, 17-18).

• When God leads us to do good, it’s imperative that we respond (4:17).

• Materialism and injustice toward the poor are absolutely contrary to the gospel (5:1-6).

• Intimacy with God through prayer empowers a gospel-transformed life (5:13-20).

. . . What can you do today to proclaim the gospel through action? Continue reading